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British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson lashed out at Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit plans in his letter of resignation, saying that Britain is "truly headed for the status of colony" and that the "dream" of Brexit "is dying".

Boris Johnson (file) in March.

He is replaced at Health and Social Care by Culture Secretary Matt Hancock, who will in turn be succeeded by Attorney General Jeremy Wright.

The Prime Minister now faces a stormy meeting with Tory MPs and peers in Parliament on Monday evening as she tries to keep her fragile administration together.

Two years after Britain voted 52 percent to 48 percent to leave the European Union, May is trying to find a middle way between two starkly differing views - within her party and the country - of the U.K.'s relationship with Europe.

The front page of the respected broadsheet Le Monde says Davis Davis "slams the door" behind him on his way out of the Cabinet and inside says his snub to May's Brexit plan "could not have been more violent".

The first step is that 15 per cent of the Parliamentary Conservative Party (currently 48 MPs) must write to Graham Brady, Chair of the Conservative Private Members' Committee (colloquially known as the 1922 Committee), and say they want a vote.

Johnson spoke for angry Conservative Brexit-backers in his resignation letter to May when he complained that voters weren't going to get the things he'd promised them when he campaigned to leave the EU.

Davis and Johnson initially backed the plan, before deciding they could not support it.

Brussels has not yet made clear how the EU27 will respond to the Chequers deal, which the government believes represents an "evolution" of its negotiating strategy.




Mrs Rudd's public slapdown came after Mr Johnson, who is widely regarded to have ambitions to become prime minister, penned a lengthy article for the Daily Telegraph that laid out his Brexit blueprint.

Under Conservative Party rules, a confidence vote in a leader can be triggered if 15 percent of Conservative lawmakers - now 48 - write a letter requesting one.

If she chose to fight, she would need the support of more than 50% of Conservative MPs - now 159 - in the confidence vote to stay in office.

After an hours-long meeting last week at her Chequers country residence, May seemed to have persuaded the most vocalBrexit campaigners in the cabinet to back her plan to press for "a free trade area for goods" with the European Union and maintain close trade ties.

"I can only regret that the idea of Brexit has not left with Davis and Johnson".

Among those rallying around the prime minister was environment minister Michael Gove - a prominent campaigner to exit the European Union alongside Johnson for the 2016 referendum - who said he would not follow suit by resigning.

In a meeting with her party late Monday, Mrs May raised the prospect that failure to back her could see the collapse of her government and give the left-wing opposition Labour party a route into power.

But the chaos surrounding the government will not die down any time soon-the contingent supporting a hard Brexit is more angry than ever. They quit amid divisions in the government over Brexit.

She said the deal agreed by the Cabinet after their "productive discussions" would "honour the result of the referendum" and allow the United Kingdom to "take back control of our borders, our law and our money".

But the leader of the Scottish Conservatives Ruth Davidson said Mrs May was "correct to accept the Foreign Secretary's resignation".


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